Thursday, August 08, 2013

1921 Census of Canada Has Arrived!


Yippee!

The 1921 Census of Canada is now available to the public! You can browse it at Ancestry.ca by geographic region, because it isn’t yet indexed by name. For more information, see 1921 Census of Canada.

I knew the census was being released today (August 8th) at about 2:00 p.m. EST, thanks to Canadian bloggers like Anglo-Celtic Connections, GenealogyCanada, and Olive Tree Genealogy Blog, among others, who reported this news yesterday.

So, this morning, I kept checking Ancestry.ca’s home page and at 11:04 a.m. (I’m on the west coast of Canada) there it was – the 1921 census ready for me and so many other genealogists, family historians, and researchers to start looking for our families.

I began my search with my paternal grandfather, Fred Belair, who I think worked for the railroad in Ramore, Cochrane District, Ontario in 1921. However, Cochrane District didn’t exist at that time, so I had to determine which district it was back then. After a few seconds, I found Temiskaming District; thank goodness there are only a handful of districts for northern Ontario.

Unfortunately, I didn’t locate my Pépère Fred in sub-district 53, which includes Ramore, of district 129. He might have been working elsewhere or been in transit. I did find his father (my great-grandfather Pierre Belair), stepmother and younger half-siblings, though, in his home village of Ste-Cécile-de-Masham in the province of Quebec.

I spent about an hour looking for and finding three of my four grandparents, their respective parents and siblings. Luckily they lived in small, rural communities in Ontario and Quebec, and I had only a few pages (anywhere from 8 to 54 images) to search. The images are legible and the handwriting is mostly easy to read, so all in all, it was a positive experience.

Now, it's back to the census to look for a few more relatives and then I’ll search for my husband’s father Bill and his family in Saskatchewan.

Happy relative hunting, everyone!

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

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