Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Sad, Stressful Times

It’s been a sad, stressful and anxious three weeks here at home. My mother Jacqueline was taken suddenly ill with pulmonary embolism and has been in hospitals (here and out-of-town) for over two weeks. During this time, our cat Patches became very ill. Coping with both of these events has left me with little time or energy for my blog.

While Mom was recovering (she hasn’t yet returned home), my family had to make a very difficult decision about our beautiful cat Patches, who’s been ill for a few months.

Our vet suspected cancer. Patches, who was about 15 years old, had multiple health issues for which she was being treated – hypothyroidism, arthritis, vestibular disease, low body temperature, kidney problems and bladder infections. The last couple of weeks before she died, Patches was even more unwell, and vomited blood. Dr. Madsen was very supportive, answered any questions we had about Patches’ health, explained that our beloved kitty would progressively get worse, and suggested some options.

We knew we had to make a decision. Since it was the weekend, our son Nicholas asked to have a few more days with Patches. None of us wanted to let her go; after 12 years of living with us, we were afraid of what life would be like without our Patches. Monday morning, I called the vet’s office and made the arrangements to have her put to sleep the next day. Nicholas and I didn’t feel we could be there, but my husband Michael said he could, so he brought Patches to the appointment.

It was the hardest, saddest decision we had to make. The vet reassured Michael that it was the best thing to do, because Patches would only get sicker. During those last few days, we gave Patches extra love, attention, cuddles and kisses. We took photos of her with us and in her favorite spots around the house. We said “I love you Patches … what a good girl …” one last time. In the afternoon of Tuesday, 22 October, 2013, Patches gently fell asleep and passed away in Michael’s arms.

We love you and miss you, Patches.

Patches the cat

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Monday, October 14, 2013

Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving Greeting poster

“Happy Thanksgiving!” to my family and friends, and to my Canadian readers and fellow bloggers!

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - What is Your Birth Surname Henry Number?

It’s Saturday, so it's another Saturday Night Genealogy Fun at Genea-Musings!

Randy explains what the Henry [descendant numbering] System is all about, shows how he applied it to his ancestral surname, and then asks his readers to calculate the Henry number in their own ancestral family.

My results:

2) My first known ancestor with my birth surname of BELAIR who immigrated to Canada from France is François Janvry dit Belair (ca 1731-1817).

Here is my line with their Henry numbers*:

1 François Janvry dit Belair (ca 1731-1817)
1 6 Pierre Janvry dit Belair (1772-1848)
1 6 17 Paul Janvry dit Belair (1822-1902)
1 6 17 4 Pierre Janvry dit Belair (1851-1941)
1 6 17 4 7 Fred Belair (1889-1991)
1 6 17 4 7 1 Maurice Belair (1927-1996)
1 6 17 4 7 1 1 Yvonne Belair (me)

* I've inserted a space between the Henry numbers in order to see clearly a child's number position within his generation. 

3) I took my “Descendants of François Janvry dit Belair” 3-ring binder that contains my homemade family group sheets of all the Belair descendants I’ve found since I began researching my family tree in the 1970s. I kept track of everyone by numbering each descendant within each generation, but never really knew that this method had its own name (the Henry System) until I came across it some years ago.

Since I’m a sixth generation descendant of François, and my (Henry) numbers are already done in my binder, it was very easy to trace my line.

Two things stand out in this list of numbers and names. First, my grandfather’s grandfather was the 17th child of his father Pierre (1772-1848). His father married twice and had 14 children by his first wife and at least 10 children by his second wife. (That’s a lot of children!) Second, my father and I are the only eldest children of our parents in this list, the others being 6th, 17th, 4th and 7th children.

4) I’m done in my own blog post and I’ve left a comment at Genea-Musings!

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, October 11, 2013

Friday Photo: Visitors from BC

On the first two Fridays of each month, I showcase a family photo and answer the “who, what, when, where and why” of that picture. The first week’s Friday photo is taken from my side of the family and the second week’s Friday photo is chosen from my husband’s side of the family. (I got the idea for this column from Amy Coffin’s ebook The Big Genealogy Blog Book advertised on her The We Tree Genealogy Blog.)


Demoskoff and Cazakoff families gathered for a photo
Demoskoff and Cazakoff families, 1961

Who:
Front: Michael (left) and his sister Margaret. Back (left to right): Michael’s father Bill, his mother Ann, her mother Mrs. George Cazakoff, his aunt and uncle Edna and Nick Cazakoff.

What:
My husband Michael poses with his parents, his sister, his maternal grandmother Polly, and his uncle Nick and wife Edna.

When:
July 1961, according to the caption on the back of the photo.

Where:
Kamsack, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Why:
Michael and his family lived on a farm about 50 kilometres (30 miles) north of Kamsack. They came to his grandmother’s house in town to see his maternal uncle Nick and his new wife Edna. The couple, who had married the previous year in British Columbia, were in Saskatchewan on a visit to Nick’s mother and his brothers and sister. Nick’s brother Larry probably took the picture, as he lived at home with his widowed mother.

Michael loves this photo, because it was the first time he met his aunt Edna, who had recently married his uncle Nick. Edna was (and still is) a welcoming, caring and generous person.

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Famous Relatives: Queen Elizabeth II

Last year, I prepared a chart for my family that showed how Queen Elizabeth II and I were distantly related. Our closest common ancestor is Robert Gaillard, who lived in Picardy, France in the 15th century. Through him, I am the 16th cousin twice removed of Queen Elizabeth II. With Her Majesty celebrating the 60th anniversary of her coronation as sovereign this year, I thought I’d show my readers how we are related.

Common Ancestor of Queen Elizabeth II and Yvonne Belair
Closest Common Ancestor of HM The Queen and Yvonne (Belair) Demoskoff


Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

The Book of Me – Prompt 6 – Journals and Diaries

The Book of Me, Written By You is a project by Julie Goucher at Anglers Rest. As Julie says, “It is about a personal journey; a journey of rediscovery of yourself and perhaps your loved ones through your eyes”. You can participate through her blog or through GeneaBloggers. For more information, see here.

Prompt 6: Journals and Diaries

• Do you keep a journal or diary?

Currently, I don’t keep a diary, but I did when I was a young teenager, being influenced to start one after reading a public library copy of Anne Frank’s diary. I wrote in my diary for a few years, but then gave it up. During high school, I bought pocket calendars to keep track of school events. After I married, I recorded my family's daily life on a kitchen wall calendar. Those pocket and wall calendars became a sort of substitute diary.

• How far back do they go? What do you record?

My teenage diaries are long gone, but I still have most of my pocket appointment calendars (the earliest one I have is from 1979) and my family calendars (those go back to 1991). I record the usual things (birthdays and anniversaries, appointments, meetings, outings and such), plus anything I want to remember that happened on a given day.

• Where do you keep them?

I don’t keep my past pocket or wall calendars in a special place; just wherever I can access them easily and quickly if I want to look up something. The information in them came in handy last year when I made personalized calendars as Christmas gifts for my brother and sister.

• Do you always buy the same one or vary them?

I used to buy the small, inexpensive ones with locks and keys. The pocket calendars were printed by Cardinal, a Canadian brand, or those Carlton Cards. The wall calendars were always those lovely ones by UNICEF that were illustrated with art work by children from around the world. When they stopped making them a couple years ago, I switched to themed calendars (like cityscapes) from Coles, the Canadian bookstore.

• Have you inherited any?

My brother gave me his travel diary from the time he went to England and France during high school and later his trip to Costa Rica. I also have one or two of my parents’ family calendars.

• Do you intend to pass along your journals or destroy them?

I destroyed my diaries years ago, but before I did, I extracted bits of interesting details onto 8 x 10 loose sheets of paper that I still have today. I’m glad I decided to save my calendars (both types), because I think they make a wonderful condensed record of my life and that of my family. I intend to pass them along and want to store them in some kind of archival quality box, but haven’t yet got around to buying one.

• Pictures - Do you have a favourite?

I remember putting a snapshot of myself in my very first diary, but generally I didn’t add much in the way of memorabilia or souvenirs.

• What do you use to write with – biro, pencil, ink or fountain pen?

I used a fountain pen a few times in the early years (I learned I to write with one in Grade 5 of elementary school), but most of the time I wrote with a ballpoint pen, like those fine point BIC pens with the blue caps and yellow barrels.

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Monday, October 07, 2013

Mappy Monday: Royal Proclamation of 1763

Map of Quebec in 1776
“A new map of the Province of Quebec according to the Royal Proclamation of the 7th October 1763 from the French surveys connected with those made after the war by Captain Carver and other officers in His Majesty's Services.”

7 October 2013 marks the 250th anniversary of the Royal Proclamation by King George III, which established “a new administrative structure for the recently acquired territories in North America [and] established new rules and protocols for future relations with First Nations people”. [1]

History was my favorite subject in school and at university. It was exciting and fun to learn about people and events; how and why things happened; to travel the world and time. I don’t seem to remember learning about the Royal Proclamation of 1763, but I’m sure that a few of my History teachers like Madame Bergeron in Grade 8 or Monsieur Paradis in Grade 10 spent some class time explaining this consequence of the Seven Years’ War and its aftermath, including how the colony of New France in North America was transferred to Great Britain from France.

The map above, published in 1776, shows the changes in boundaries of the government of Quebec as a result of the Proclamation. [2]

Image Credit: Library and Archives Canada. Cartographer: Jonathan Carver (1710-1780).

Sources:

1. “250th Anniversary of the Royal Proclamation of 1763”, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/ : accessed 3 October 2013).

2. “Archives Search”, Library and Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/search/Pages/search.aspx : accessed 3 October 2013), “royal proclamation”.

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Sunday, October 06, 2013

Sunday’s Obituary: Paul Stooshinoff

Obituary of Paul Stooshinoff
Paul Stooshinoff obituary, 1972

Forty-one years ago today (6 October 1972) a single-car accident claimed the life of Paul Stooshinoff. He was only 20 years old. He was one of my husband Michael’s school friends.

Paul and Michael met as teenagers in junior high school in Kamsack, Saskatchewan, where they lived. They hung out together with other boys from school, like Kerry Horkoff and Danny Derhousoff. After Michael graduated from Kamsack Collegiate and moved to Grand Forks, British Columbia, Paul and Kerry followed him there to find work.

One autumn afternoon, Paul lost control of his Dodge Charger and struck a tree on a quiet residential street in Grand Forks. He died at the scene.

The funeral, which took place in Kamsack, was co-officiated by Michael's maternal uncle, Larry Cazakoff.

Paul's tragic and untimely death deeply affected his family, his girlfriend, his friends and co-workers. Michael has never forgotten his friend who died so young and so long ago.

Source:

Paul Stooshinoff, obituary, undated clipping (1972), from unidentified newspaper; Demoskoff Family Papers, privately held by Yvonne (Belair) Demoskoff, British Columbia. Yvonne acquired assorted memorabilia (including Paul’s obituary) in January 2012 from her father-in-law William (Bill) Demoskoff.

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Saturday, October 05, 2013

Sibling Saturday: Euphrosine and Elisabeth Laronde


My ancestor Euphrosine Laronde is sometimes confused with her younger sister Elisabeth in family trees at Ancestry.ca. Those muddled trees give her two husbands (Jean-Baptiste Guérard and François-Xavier Gaudette) and give 1878 as her year of death.

Based on my research, Euphrosine had one husband, Guérard, and she died before the 1861 census. It was her younger sister Elisabeth who was the wife of Gaudette, and who died in 1878.

Background Information

Euphrosine and Elisabeth were the daughters of Toussaint Laronde and his Aboriginal wife Marie Kekijicakoe. [1] The Laronde family lived on Ile aux Allumettes, an island located in the Ottawa River between the province of Quebec on the east and the province of Ontario on the west.

Euphrosine was born about 1820 or 1821 at Lake Nipissing. [2] Elisabeth was born between 1826 and 1831 in Ontario or Quebec. [3]

Euphrosine married Jean-Baptiste Guérard at an unknown date and place, but presumably before December 1840. [4] (I’ve written about how I haven’t been able to find their marriage record here.) The couple had three children.

Elisabeth and François-Xavier Gaudette’s date and place of marriage are also unknown, but the event took place before 30 April 1846. [5] They had seven children.

Separate Identities

I examined the sacramental records for the parish of St-Alphonse de Liguori on Ile des Allumettes and made a list of the different names under which the two sisters appeared. The results gave me a better understanding of the sisters’ identities at various times in their lives.

In Euphrosine’s case, she was known as ‘Euphrosine’ as early as 1824. [6] On other occasions, she was known by what appears to be shortened phonetic versions of that name: ‘Frisin’ and ‘Fisina’. [7] Interestingly, I found only one occasion where she was known as ‘Isabella’. [8]

Meanwhile, her sister Elisabeth was known as Elizabeth/Elisabeth, [9] Isabelle/Isabella, [10] or Eliza. [11]

Family Units

Now that Euphrosine and Elisabeth’s names and aliases were established, I turned to baptism records to recreate their family units.

Euphrosine and Jean-Baptiste had three known children:

• Marie (Mary), born December 1840 [12]
• Delina (Célina), born 4 August 1851 [13]
• Euphémie, born 24 October 1852 [14]

All three daughters were baptised at the parish church at Chapeau on Ile aux Allumettes, with the records stating they were the children of Jean Baptiste Guéra[rd] and Euphrosine Laronde (1840), John B. Gerrard and Fisina Laronde (1851), and J.B. Girrard and Felicita Laronde (1852).

Elisabeth and François-Xavier had seven known children:

• Francis (Olivier), born 30 November 1846 [15]
• Michael, born 3 September 1848 [16]
• Mary Julie, born 2 October 1858 [17]
• Andrew (Denis), born 18 January 1861 [18]
• Toussaint, born 12 March 1863 [19]
• Susanne, born 9 June 1864 [20]
• Mederick (Edward), born 20 June 1867 [21]

Like their Guérard cousins, the Gaudette siblings were baptised at Chapeau. The records show they were the children of Francis Gaudette and Isabella Laronde (1846), Xavier Gaudet and Isabella Laronde (1848), Michel [sic] Gaudette and Elisabeth Laronde (1858), Francis [X.] Gaudette and Elizabeth Laronde (1861), Francis Xavier Gaudette and Isabella Le Rhonde (1863), Francis X. Gaudet and Elizabeth Leronde (1864), and Xavier Gaudet and Isabelle Leronde (1867).

More Clues

Two sets of godparents stood out among these baptism records. First, Michael Gaudette’s godparents at his 1848 baptism are recorded as “Michael Gaudet” and “Frisin Laronde”. [22] Although the relationship between the infant and his godparents isn’t stated in the parish register, Michel is likely his father’s brother, while Frisin is likely his mother’s sister. (In French, ‘Frisin’ sounds like a shortened version of ‘Euphrosine’: Euphrosine = Phrosine = Frisin.)

Second, at Delina Guérard’s baptism in 1851, her godparents are named “X. Gaudet” and “Isabell Laronde”. [23] Again, no relationship is stated, but they are likely her mother’s brother-in-law and her sister.

Sorting Death Dates

The exact date and place of Euphrosine’s death is a mystery to me. However, the event occurred between 24 October 1852 when her daughter Euphémie was baptised [24] and the 1861 census of Canada on which her husband is a widower. [25]

Unlike her sister, Elisabeth’s date and place of death are known. Her burial record states that she died on 11 October 1878 and that she was buried in Chapeau two days later. [26] Her widowed husband remarried in 1883. [27]

Conclusion

Sacramental and census records helped untangle fact from fiction and eliminated confusion between Euphrosine and Elisabeth Laronde. They showed that although the sisters both used the name Isabella, Euphrosine married Jean-Baptiste Guérard and died before the 1861 census, while Elisabeth was the wife of François-Xavier Gaudette and died in 1878.

Sources:

1. Marie's surname is "Kekijicakoe" or "Kekijicoköe" in her son François' baptism record. To date, this is the only record I have found in which her Aboriginal surname is stated. St-Grégoire-de-Nazianze (Buckingham, Quebec), parish register, 1839-1854, p. 35 verso, entry no. B136 (1840), Francis Laronde baptism, 15 September 1840; St-Grégoire-de-Nazianze parish; digital image, "Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967", Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 28 February 2011).

2. “Registres paroissiaux” [Régistres des missions de 19 juillet 1836 au 27 may [sic] 1839], p. 77 verso, no entry no., Laronde – Laronde marriage rehabilitation, 28 August 1838; Family History Library (FHL) microfilm 1703968. Euphrosine’s age (17) is stated in her parents’ marriage record. Also, Ste-Anne (Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec), parish register, 1796-1846, p. 54 verso, no entry no. (1824), Euphroisine [sic] Laronde baptism, 28 July 1824; Ste-Anne parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 4 March 2011). Euphrosine was 3 years old. Her baptismal entry states she was born “au Lac Népiscingue” [at Lake Nipissing].

3. “Registres paroissiaux”, p. 77 verso, Laronde – Laronde marriage rehabilitation, 28 August 1838. Elisabeth was 11 years old. Also, “Registres paroissiaux” [Régistres des missions de 19 juillet 1836 au 27 may [sic] 1839], p. 77 verso, entry no. B117 and B118, Marie and Elizabeth Laronde baptism, 28 August 1838; FHL microfilm 1703968. Elisabeth was about 11 years old. Also, 1871 census of Canada, Allumette Island, Pontiac South, Quebec, population schedule, division 01, subdistrict k, p. 20, dwelling 59, family 71, Elizabeth Gaudette; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 July 2009); citing Library and Archives Canada microfilm C-10025. Elisabeth is 43 years old and her place of birth is Ontario. Also, St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1876-1886, p. 56 recto, entry no. S15 (1878), Isabelle Laronde burial, 13 October 1878; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 April 2009). Elisabeth was 48 years old. Also, 1861 census of Canada, [Allumettes,] Pontiac, Canada East [Quebec], population schedule, p. 12, line 21, Eliza Gaudet [sic]; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 July 2009); citing Library and Archives Canada microfilm C-1305. Elizabeth was 30 years old and was born in Lower Canada [Quebec].

4. Euphrosine and Jean-Baptiste’s marriage date is deduced from when their presumed eldest daughter Marie was born – “dans le mois de décembre dernier” [in the month of last December]. St-Paul (Aylmer, Quebec), parish register, 1841-1851, p. 14 verso, no entry no. (1841), Marie Guérard baptism, 4 February 1841; St-Paul parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 11 March 2008). Marie’s baptism took place in the “mission de St Alphonse de Liguori des Allumettes”, but the priest recorded the event in St-Paul’s sacramental register.

5. Elisabeth and François-Xavier married before 30 April 1846, because they are described as a married couple who witnessed the marriage of François-Xavier’s brother Michel Gaudet [sic] to Vitaline Généreux on that date. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 20 verso, entry no. M20 (1846), Gaudet – Généreux marriage, 30 April 1846; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 9 February 2011).

6. Ste-Anne, parish register, 1796-1846, p. 54 verso, Euphroisine [sic] Laronde baptism, 28 July 1824.

7. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 78 recto, entry no. B76 (1848), Michael Gaudet [sic] baptism, 10 September 1848; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011). Euphrosine’s name is rendered as “Frisin Laronde” in her godchild’s baptism record. Also, St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 137 recto, entry no. B77 (1851), Delina Gerrard [sic] baptism, 5 August 1851; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 11 March 2008). Euphrosine appears as “Fisina Laronde” at her daughter’s baptism.

8. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1859-1876, p. 278 recto, entry no. M16 (1870), Foisy – Guérard marriage, 10 October 1870; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 30 March 2009). Euphrosine’s name is given as “Isabella Laronde” in her daughter’s marriage record.

9. “Registres paroissiaux”, p. 77 verso, Marie and Elizabeth Laronde baptism, 28 August 1838. Elisabeth’s name is spelled “Elizabeth” at her baptism. Also, St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856 [sic], p. 232 verso, entry no. B55 (1858), Mary Julie Gaudette baptism, 10 October 1858; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011). Elisabeth’s name is spelled “Elisabeth” in her daughter’s baptism record.

10. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1846-1856, p. 20 verso, Gaudet – Généreux marriage, 30 April 1846. Elisabeth’s name is rendered as “Isabelle” on this occasion. Also, St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 39 recto, entry no. B186 (1846), Francis Gaudette baptism, 1 December 1846; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011). Elisabeth appears as “Isabella Laronde” in her son’s baptism record.

11. 1861 census of Canada, [Allumettes,] Pontiac, Canada East [Quebec], pop. sched., p. 12, line 21, Eliza Gaudet [sic].

12. St-Paul, parish register, 1841-1851, p. 14 verso, Marie Guérard baptism, 4 February 1841.

13. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1846-1856, p. 137 recto, Delina Gerrard [sic] baptism, 5 August 1851.

14. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 164 verso, entry no. B95 (1852), Euph[émie] Guérard baptism, 24 October 1852; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 11 March 2008).

15. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 39 recto, entry no. B186 (1846), Francis Gaudette baptism, 1 December 1846; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011).

16. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1846-1856, p. 78 recto, Michael Gaudet [sic] baptism, 10 September 1848.

17. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 232 verso, entry no. B55 (1858), Mary Julie Gaudette baptism, 10 October 1858; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011).

18. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1857-1876, p. 44 recto, entry no. B22 (1861), Andrew Gaudette baptism, 2 February 1861; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 22 June 2010).

19. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1857-1876, p. 107 verso, entry no. B22 (1863), Toussaint Gaudette baptism, 13 March 1863; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011).

20. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1857-1876, p. 141 recto, entry no. B49 (1864), Susanne Gaudet [sic] baptism, 14 June 1864; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011).

21. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1857-1876, p. 208 verso, entry no. B52 (1867), Mederick Gaudet [sic] baptism, 24 June 1867; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 6 March 2011).

22. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1846-1856, p. 78 recto, Michael Gaudet [sic] baptism, 10 September 1848.

23. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1846-1856, p. 137 recto, Delina Gerrard [sic] baptism, 5 August 1851.

24. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1846-1856, p. 164 verso, Euph[émie] Guérard baptism, 24 October 1852.

25. 1861 census of Canada, [Township of Chichester,] Pontiac, Canada East [Quebec], population schedule, p. 132, line 11, Bte Gerard [sic]; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 8 June 2010); citing Library and Archives Canada microfilm C-1305. The official enumeration date was 14 January 1861.

26. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1876-1886, p. 56 recto, Isabelle Laronde burial, 13 October 1878.

27. François-Xavier married widow Maria Pack on 16 October 1883 in Chapeau. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1876-1886, p. 139 recto, entry no. M13 (1883), Gaudette – Pack marriage, 16 October 1883; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 April 2009).

Copyright (c) 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, October 04, 2013

Friday Photo: Father and Children

On the first two Fridays of each month, I showcase a family photo and answer the “who, what, when, where and why” of that picture. The first week’s Friday photo is taken from my side of the family and the second week’s Friday photo is chosen from my husband’s side of the family. (I got the idea for this column from Amy Coffin’s ebook The Big Genealogy Blog Book advertised on her The We Tree Genealogy Blog.)

Fred Belair with his son Maurice Belair and his daughter Darlene Belair
Fred Belair with his children Darlene (centre) and Maurice (right), 1960s

Who:
Fred Belair (left) with his daughter Darlene and son Maurice. (The handwriting at the top of the picture belongs to Dad’s other sister, Joan.)

What:
My paternal grandfather Fred poses with his children Maurice and Darlene.

When:
Probably summer in the mid- to late 1960s.

Where:
In the province of Ontario, Canada, possibly in Timmins (where my family lived) or in Peterborough (where my aunt lived).

Why:
I don’t know why this photo was taken. I hope that a relative will see the picture and know when, where and why my Dad, his sister and their father were together.

I love this photo, despite not knowing anything about its occasion. Actually, it’s more accurate to say that this picture is a digital scan of a photograph. The original is owned by my aunt Joan (Dad’s sister) and she brought it along with other family photos and memorabilia when she visited my home in April 2011. My husband and I were so busy scanning all those items that I guess I neglected to ask aunt Joan what she remembered about this picture.

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Wednesday, October 02, 2013

Ancestral Anniversaries for October 2013

From October to December last year, I posted articles about some of my ancestors’ life events that marked an anniversary in 2012. I’m continuing this series by presenting a selection of ancestral events for 2013.

2 October 1693:
Marriage contract between Charles Brazeau and Geneviève Quenneville. The contract was drawn up by notary Antoine Adhémar. Three days later, the couple wed in a religious ceremony in Montreal. Charles and Geneviève had a large family: eleven sons and five daughters, all born in Montreal or nearby Pointe-aux-Trembles. Charles, originally from Paris, France, was a cartwright or wheelwright. After his wife’s death in July 1726, he remarried twice, but had no further children. Charles and Geneviève are my paternal ancestors.

4 October 1853:
Marriage of Ménésippe Meunier and Louise (Eloise) Drouin in Ste-Cécile-de-Masham, Gatineau County, Quebec. They were fourth cousins, but no mention of consanguinity is mentioned in their marriage record. They lived in Masham, where their eleven children were born, including their eldest, Angélina, my great-grandmother. Ménésippe and Louise are my paternal ancestors.

7 October 1823:
Death of Ignace Racette in L’Assomption, L’Assomption County, Quebec. Ignace, who was 83 years old, was buried there two days later. After the death of his first wife in October 1800, Ignace married Marguerite Naud in February 1802; a thirty-one year age gap separated them. Ignace and Marguerite are my maternal ancestors.

14 October 1673:
Birth of Charles Tinon dit Desroches at Rivières-aux-Roches, St-Augustin-de-Desmaures, Portneuf County, Quebec. He was the third child but eldest surviving son of his immigrant parents Emard Tinon dit Desroches and Aimée Roux, a fille du Roi. Charles married Marie-Anne Bonnodeau in 1700 in Quebec City and had thirteen children. Marie-Anne died in 1728, the year that Charles served as a militia captain. He remarried and had a further six children. Charles and Marie-Anne are my maternal ancestors.

17 October 1803:
Marriage of François Desgroseilliers and Louise Roy in St-Constant, Laprairie County, Quebec. Louise was supposedly a widow at this marriage, but I haven’t been able to find documentary proof of the event. She and François had ten children, all born in Châteauguay and Beauharnois. After her death in 1839, François might have remarried twice, and died possibly in 1865. François and Louise are my maternal ancestors.

26 October 1703:
Birth of Jean Charbonneau in Lachenaie, L’Assomption County, Quebec. His baptism was recorded in the sacramental register of nearby Rivière-des-Prairies when he was two days old. Jean was the seventh child and fifth son of Joseph Charbonneau and his wife Anne Picard. Jean married twice: first, in 1724 to Marie-Anne Carpentier, by whom he was widowed, and second, in 1734 to Barbe Séguin. Jean and Barbe are my paternal ancestors.

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Tombstone Tuesday: Mary Casacove

Gravemarker of Mary Casacove
Mary Casacove gravemarker

Mary was the wife of Philip Casacove ( Cazakoff), my husband’s maternal uncle.

Mary, daughter of George and Annie (Bedinoff) Abrosimoff, was born in 1918 in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. She and Philip married in June 1948 in Vancouver, British Columbia and had two daughters, Donna and Elizabeth.

Mary died eleven years ago today on 1 October 2002. She was buried next to her husband Philip, who predeceased her in 1976, at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Her gravemarker reads:

IN LOVING MEMORY
MARY CASACOVE
1918 – 2002

Copyright © 2013, Yvonne Demoskoff.