Saturday, April 09, 2016

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Three More Ancestry Questions

It’s Saturday, and Randy over at Genea-Musings has issued his weekly challenge to his readers.

Tonight’s challenge is “Three More Ancestry Questions”.

The first part of the assignment:

* Name four places on my ancestral home bucket list I’d like to visit:

* What are the four most unusual surnames in your family tree?

* Which four brick walls would you most like to smash through?

We “answer each of the questions based on your own ancestors, not the collateral lines” [and then] “share your answers with us in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this post, in a Facebook post or a Google+ post. Please provide a link to your response if you can.”

Here are my answers:

1. Name four places on my ancestral home bucket list I’d like to visit:

• Chapeau, Pontiac County, Quebec (where my grandmother Julie (Vanasse) Belair was born in 1896).

• Dives, Picardie, France (where my Belair ancestor was born about 1731-1736).

• Charly-sur-Marne, Champagne, France (where my mother’s Desgroseilliers ancestor was 
born in 1618).

• Deerfield, Franklin, Massachusetts (where my ancestors Sarah Allen and Elizabeth Price were captured in 1704 and brought to Canada).

2. What are the four most unusual surnames in your family tree?

• Durgey (François, from New Hampshire)

• Kekijicakoe (Marie, Native American, possibly Algonquin)

• Poisson (Barbe, a fille à marier, from Perche, France)

• Raza (Pierre, an immigrant from Guyenne, France)

3. Which four brick walls would you most like to smash through?

• François Janvry dit Belair (ca 1736-1817), my patrilineal ancestor. From Dives, Picardie, France, François came to Canada in the mid-1750s as a Seven Years War soldier. His surname is “Zénéry dit Beller” in a 1759 Quebec hospital register, but it might have been “Dufay” in France. I’d really like to locate his baptism record to see just how his father’s name is written.

• François Durgey (ca 1769-between 1851-1861), originally from New Hampshire, USA. His surname is rendered as Dogie, Doggie, Dogy, Doyer, and Durgey in Canadian records. I’ve done some research on him and once found an online article (for which I didn’t record the URL) that suggests his surname might be Durkee.

• Toussaint Laronde (ca 1783-between 1846-1870), described sometimes as “sauvage”, he is more likely Metis. According to certain online trees, Toussaint is the son of Louis Denis de LaRonde and his Native American common-law wife Marie Madeleine Wosneswesquigigo, but there doesn’t seem to be documentary evidence for this parentage.

• Michel Frappier (ca 1794-1860), whose parents I haven’t been able to identify, but who might be Michel and Marie Anne (Varry) Frappier of Chambly County, Quebec or Antoine and Josephte (Neveu) Frappier of Berthier County, Quebec.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

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