Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Kelowna 2016 Conference

Kelowna 2016 conference display
Conference display

Michael and I are back from our weekend at the KDGS “Harvest Your Family Tree” Conference 2016 in Kelowna, British Columbia. The time went by too fast, but we met new people, learned about genealogy records, methods and products, and had great speakers share their knowledge with us. Michael even won a door prize (a twelve month World Subscription to findmypast.com).

We each sat in on four sessions, including “How to Save Your Research” with Lisa Louise Cooke and “Genealogy at Library & Archives Canada” with Nicole Watier. There were over 200 attendees, many of whom were locals, but some like us were from out-of-town. There were the usual features like the marketplace with vendors and exhibitors, but this year the conference organizers added “Pop-Up Talks” during the lunch hour, including a demonstration of the Zcan Mouse by Shop the Hound.

Kelowna 2016 conference marketplace
Conference marketplace

I didn’t attend any of the Friday workshops. Instead, I opted to visit Kelowna’s Memorial Park (city) Cemetery. I paid my respects at the graves of distant relatives, Gilbert Grozelle, his wife Mary and their son Murray. I also took photos of their markers and will post them on my blog under “Tombstone Tuesday”.

At the marketplace, I bought a book (The Doukhobors, by George Woodcock & Ivan Avakumovic) and some back issues of “Families” (the quarterly journal of the Ontario Genealogical Society) and “British Columbia History” (the magazine of the British Columbia Historical Federation). I also bought some archival photo (print) sleeves.

In our conference bag, donated by My Heritage, were various items, including a FamilyTreeDNA discount coupon for their DNA test kits. (I’m going to use mine to order the ‘Family Finder’ test for my Mom.)

Nicole Watier, a genealogist with Library and Archives Canada, talked about genealogy at LAC. She mentioned that the website is being redesigned, described new databases, and encouraged researchers to visit LAC in person to access record sets that aren’t digitized, like those of the Canadian National Railway (CNR) and capital cases. Nicole also talked about the progress LAC is making with its digitization program of the CEF WWI service files (a team of 15 people work on it) and how new fields (like a soldier’s place of birth) are being added to the search page of the online database.

Pennask Summit on Coquihalla Highway
Pennask Summit (1728 m, 5669 ft) on our return home via the Coquihalla Highway

Overall, it was a great genealogical weekend!

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

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